We’re the exclusive wine sponsor of the 2017 Eaux Claires festival – June 16-17

We’re the exclusive wine sponsor of the 2017 Eaux Claires festival – June 16-17

We’re very excited to announce that we will again be the exclusive wine sponsor of the Eaux Claires Music and Arts Festival, June 16-17! According to their website, Eaux Claires is “a two-day, multi-stage experience featuring live music, performance art, visual art, food and more.”

This year’s lineup has been released on their website and features Paul Simon, John Prine, Bon Iver, Wilco and many more.

The festival is held at Foster Farms in Eau Claire. Passes are on sale now, and we look forward to seeing you there for great music, amazing art and a weekend full of local goodness, like Autumn Harvest wine!

We’re the official wine sponsor of the Blue Ox Music Festival – June 8-10

We’re excited to announce that we will again be the exclusive wine sponsor of the Blue Ox Music Festival on June 8-10. We had a great time last year and can’t wait to “Dance Our Grass Off” with you all again!

This is the outdoor Bluegrass, Roots, and Americana music festival’s their year. Held at Whispering Pines Campgrounds in Eau Claire, it’s sure to be a fun weekend full of great music. Follow us here and on our Facebook page for updates on the festival.

As seen on WEAU 13 News – Wine Pairing Tips for the Holidays

As seen on WEAU 13 News – Wine Pairing Tips for the Holidays

As seen on WEAU 13 News:

Quite simply, wine selection for a holiday party can be overwhelming. Make it easy on yourself and go right to you local wine section. It won’t limit your choices, it will save you time and make the process easy!

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If you’re cooking beef, steak or stew, match the intensity of the food with that of the wine. If you’re serving beef or steak or a hearty stew, grab a Merlot or Cabernet with stronger tannins. Italian food can be great with a Pinot Noir, which is usually medium-bodied and less intense. Do not chill. Chicken, seafood, or soups would be enhanced by a lighter white wine like a non-oaked Chardonnay, Riesling or Pinot Grigio.  Serve chilled.

We all have cookie platters this time of year and is paired well with a sweet or semi-sweet Riesling like Northern Lights.  You can never go wrong with a nice Moscato. You can also leave that out for cheesecake and pie!

I total agree with Michael on Facebook that a red semi-sweet fruit blend like Blue Heaven goes nicely with dark chocolate covered pretzels, or this red wine fudge recipe we just put on our Facebook page!  You use 2 tablespoons of red wine and bring the rest of the bottle with you to serve them together. It’s an easy last-minute recipe if you need something to bring to your holiday gathering!

As seen on WEAU 13 News – Channel your wine knowledge

As seen on WEAU 13 News – Channel your wine knowledge

As seen on WEAU 13 News’ Hello Wisconsin Newscast:

CHIPPEWA FALLS, Wis. (WEAU) — The leaves are beautiful right now, the air is crisp, and there are some gorgeous evenings ahead. We know nothing goes better than a great dinner party than wine, but are you doing it right? We have a winemaker in here today, to help us channel our wine knowledge!

Jean McIlquham is the Owner of Autumn Harvest Winery joined Hello Wisconsin and she joined the show to help us hit the high points

Jean, if we’re investing in wine, what should we know about properly storing it so it doesn’t go bad?

Jean discussed the proper temperatures for storing both white and red wines. For white wines, she recommends taking it out of the refrigerator 20 minutes ahead of serving time. You can try tasting one that was pulled out right away and one that waited the recommended amount to recognize the taste difference.

As seen on GO Chippewa Falls – The Chippewa Falls Ultimate Fall Bucket List

As seen on GO Chippewa Falls – The Chippewa Falls Ultimate Fall Bucket List

As seen on GoChippewaFalls.com:

The Fall is ultimately my favorite season. The weather is cooler, the food is tastier, the fashion is cuter, and the holidays are better. In Chippewa Falls, we want you to be able to experience everything the autumn season has to offer. I’ve compiled my personal GO-to list of 25 Fun Fall Festivities to help you get the most out of Chippewa Falls. Don’t forget to take plenty of pictures doing these activities and tag us #GoChippewaFalls! You could be featured on our social media pages!

We’d love to hear what your Fall Must-Do traditions, send us a message!

Until next time, Chippewa Falls!

-Ally

Wisconsin’s wineries, large and small, pouring it on: The List – As seen in the Milwaukee Business Journal

Wisconsin’s wineries, large and small, pouring it on: The List – As seen in the Milwaukee Business Journal

Autumn Harvest Winery was included in the Milwaukee Business Journal’s The List of Largest Wisconsin Wineries and featured in the accompanying article. You can read more below.

As seen in the Milwaukee Business Journal:

Taking taste buds to new heights, wineries around Wisconsin are creating flavorful wines and are welcoming visitors to come to their tasting rooms and sip for a while.

Many of the winemakers are establishing themselves as local favorites as well as putting their particular wine specialties on the map.

The list of the largest wineries in the state is ranked by cases of wine produced in 2015. And each winery listed submitted information on their vineyards and wineries to the Milwaukee Business Journal.

Only those submitting information requested are considered for inclusion on The List.

Number one on this year’s list with 100,000 cases of wine produced in 2015 is Wollersheim Winery, Prairie du Sac.

Besides the cases produced, The List offers information about the number of wine varieties, the number of employees in the state, and samples of some of their wines, plus names of top winery executives.

One thing that struck me in information submitted and questions answered was how family pride and tradition play a big role in the winery scene around the state. Interesting to note is that 22 of the 25 largest wineries are 100 percent family-owned.

At Autumn Harvest Winery in Chippewa Falls, co-owner Jean McIlquham said, “The most rewarding part of the business is spending time with our family. Just about everyone that works with us here is family and we do everything together from picking apples to bottling the wine.”

Also included in the web version of The List is information about the percent of wine produced from Wisconsin grapes, either from an estate vineyard or with help of other growers in the state.

And from this information it is clear that many wineries are producing and bottling a portion of their products from grapes shipped fresh from areas outside of the state in parts of the country more conducive to particular varieties.

Expressing what makes their work so rewarding is something many winemakers were only too happy to convey.

Paul Koehler, general manager of Captain’s Walk Winery in Green Bay said, “The diverse following that we draw from both locally, nationally and abroad. I find it very gratifying to help produce and present a line of wines and hard ciders that people enjoy.”

At Burr Oak Winery-Kennedy Vineyards, New Lisbon, manager Terri Bell said simply, “The best part of the business is the people we get to meet. Everyday we meet the nicest people.”

Echoing that was Laura Roessler, winemaker at Elmaro Vineyard, Trempealeau, who noted she enjoys that “people love to be here as much as we do.”

President and winemaker at Mount Horeb’s Fisher King Winery, Alwyn Fitzgerald, said the most rewarding aspect for him is seeing patrons congregate at the winery, really enjoying the wine he has produced.

Steve Johnson, owner and winemaker of Parallel 44 Vineyard and Winery, Kewaunee, honed in on the process of winemaking that gives him the most satisfaction.

“What I enjoy most is the journey of growing the wine from bud to bottle, knowing that the choices and effort is reflected in every aspect of the finished wine,” he said.

A few wineries that stepped up and sent information didn’t make the list for cases produced but that doesn’t diminish the work they are doing and contributions they are making to the wine industry in the state — and their wines, of course.

Vines to Cellar Winery in Port Washington, just missed the list with 1,666 cases produced in 2015, but touted its U-Vin program where guests can come in and help produce a batch of wine, work with the winemaker, learn the basics of winemaking and then return to fill, cork and label your own 30-bottle batch of wine.

Two newer wineries also submitted data. At Duck Creek Vineyard and Winery, opened in Denmark in 2013, production in 2015 was 800 cases. And at newcomer Brambleberry Winery, opened in Taylor in 2014, production for 2015 was 416 cases.

Brambleberry owner Chris Hardie said, “To see the reaction of customers when they realize that they might really like a type of wine when they say they don’t. They have not been given a proper wine tasting.”